Wednesday, February 22, 2017

The Holocaust

 

What was the Holocaust?

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from the website of Yad Vashem - Jerusalem, Israel

The Holocaust was the murder of approximately six million Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators. Between the German invasion of the Soviet Union in the summer of 1941 and the end of the war in Europe in May 1945, Nazi Germany and its accomplices strove to murder every Jew under their domination. Because Nazi discrimination against the Jews began with Hitler's accession to power in January 1933, many historians consider this the start of the Holocaust era.

The Jews were not the only victims of Hitler's regime, but they were the only group that the Nazis sought to destroy entirely. The term Holocaust is defined by the New Lexicon Webster's Dictionary of the English Language (1989) as a large-scale sacrifice or destruction, especially of life, especially by fire. As the research of Jon Petrie shows, Holocaust was already used by some writers during the war itself to describe what was happening to the Jews. Alongside it, various other terms such as destruction, disaster, and catastrophe have been and are still being used today to describe the fate of the Jews in Nazi-dominated Europe, although the dominant usage in American English since the middle of the 1960s is of the word Holocaust.

In Hebrew, the word Shoah is used, and it appears more and more frequently in English-language texts. Genocide is a legal term for the destruction of the essential foundations of the life of national groups. It may include, but does not necessarily include, the physical annihilation of the group. The Holocaust is an expression, and arguably the most extreme expression, of genocide.


 The Survivors who came to Ben David

 The Number

 The Memorials

 The Denial

 The Facts

 

Weekly Scripture Reading

For
Shabbat Yitro
February 18 / Sh'vat 22, 5777

 

Parashah: Yitro — “Jethro"

— Torah:
Exodus 18:1 – 20:23

— Haftarah: Isaiah 6:1 — 7:6, 9:5-6


The apostles taught us that the Torah is about the Messiah, thus Torah is a tutor for us to come to know Him and His righteousness. Torah's commandments are teaching us how to live a godly life, to be equipped to enter in the good works that God prepared for us from the eternity past. Thus, even though we live in an era free of the fear of the punishment for not obeying all of these commandments, it is for our benefit to heed their teaching, because they are for our correction and for our training in righteousness. By obeying Torah we show God that we are sincere in our desire to make teshuvah, to repent of our sins...

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